Let’s Celebrate

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Every day offers an opportunity to celebrate, but we generally ignore it. Instead we’re waiting for a special opportunity– that type of opportunity that offers a  big bang climax, maybe even sparklers and fireworks lighting up the sky.   We forget that there are both big celebratory events and mini- moments. Think of them! Can you give it a try—like celebrating when you find  a quarter laying on the pavement, or a  chocolate cake reduced to $5.95.

The word “celebrate,” I think, is really a synonym for other words such as  “commemorate” or “appreciate.”  In fact, “celebrate” in its simplest form  may mean being “thankful” for something whether it’s large or small.

Yes, most of the time we use “celebrate” only for special events, when actually we should be celebrating every moment—good or bad.  Celebrating a good thing always seems to be easy and greeted with anticipation.  But to celebrate a bad moment or event is very hard to do and generally seldom heard of.  Bad luck , we call it.

Even recognizing that we might  learn a lesson from an unfortunate moment  shuts down our ability and willingness  to feel and care and think objectively.  Why should we celebrate the bad or sad times?  Because it lets us become something of a forensic expert who examines all the features and facts of a problem.  To remember, perhaps, to look back and ask ourselves: Could we have done better?  Was there something I could have done that I didn’t do or say?

Can you remember one good thing that came out of a bad event?  In the case of world affairs, often there is a treaty or

policy that brings forth peace or greater understandings.  On a smaller scale a neighbor may shake a neighbor’s hand after an angry encounter,

Dating back to the beginning of time, there are traditional events that have become the fabric of our culture.   There are religious  holidays such as Christmas that we celebrate with reverence  and historical campaigns such as the  Fourth of July  or Memorial Day that are greeted with parades and red, white and blue banners.  Families frequently gather in personal ways for  birthdays, anniversaries, graduations and reunions that are observed in a celebratory manner.

If you are looking to  start your own celebration,  challenge yourself.  Or, there also  is a book that can help  jump start  and find special days and months that you might want to observe.  It’s called  “Chase’s Calendar.”  It lists all types of events that will bring a smile to an otherwise dull day such as National Hot Dog Month that has been celebrated for over thirty years each July, or  National Donut Day, National Pickle Week or Avocado Day that was started last week  (July, 2018).

But something  much easier to do is  to look up into the sky at night or in the day —or out across your garden where you might see a flower or a tall green weed, and think in a positive  way.

In fact, shout it out.  “Celebrate.”   It’s a good exercise and it lets every inch and breath  of your body celebrate every day of  your life.  Do it now. Then whisper softly,  “thank you, thank you, thank you.”

Now that’s  a good way–, no a great  way  to celebrate!

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